Wait for me, Daddy – WW II – New Westminster, BC, 1940

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Wait_for_Me_Daddy-New Westminster_1940

The City of New Westminster, British Columbia, unveiled a new monument early this October, a sculpture by Veronica and Edwin Dam De Nogales, based on the well known photograph often called “Wait for Me, Daddy” taken October 1, 1940 as the British Columbia Regiment, Duke of Connaught’s Own Rifles, marched down Eighth Street in New Westminster towards the train station.  Continue reading

Kelowna – Selected Genealogical Sources

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Collins_tobacco_field-Mission_Valley-Kelowna-1898Kelowna & District Genealogical Society. Currently the society has over 11575 obituaries indexed and available, as well as transcriptions, photographs and publications of Central Okanagan cemeteries. The Society publishes a newsletter, “Okanagan Researcher” quarterly and has partnered with the Kelowna Branch of the Okanagan Regional Library where the genealogical library collection is now located. See the Society’s website for indexes and details on these and other projects.: http://www.kdgs.ca

Video about the Kelowna & District Genealogical Society and the Kelowna Public Library, ShawTV Okanagan, 2011: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZ3E2EM63iE   Continue reading

Victoria becames British Columbia’s capital, 1868

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News of the Queen’s Birthday from Victoria, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, 1868.

“The annual races which are held on the 24th came off on Monday the 25th, in consequence of the Queen’s birthday falling on Sunday. The races on Beacon Hill were the most largely and generally attended of any which have hitherto taken place on Vancouver Island, over 1,5000 persons being present. The day was fine and pleasant….”

The same issue of the British Colonist reporting on the holiday horse races included the text of the Proclamation declaring Victoria the Capital of the United Colony of British Columbia. “There was no official ceremony used on the occasion, the Proclamation being posted at the High Sheriff’s office and othe public places in the city.”

The British Colonist, Tuesday morning, 26 May, 1868, page 2.

Residents at Yale, 1868

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Below is a list of 1868 residents of Yale, B.C., “nearly all the principal people of Yale”, from a document sent to Victoria to the Hon. P. O’Reilly and the Hon. Mr. F. J. Barnard, Yale representatives, supporting retention of New Westminster as the Capital of British Columbia. “Two or three prominent gentlemen” did not sign; it was said that they were absent at the time.

Extracted from an article in the British Columbian newspaper, Wednesday, 8 April 1868, page 1. Names here alphabetically.

We, the undersigned inhabitants of Yale, hereby express our wish that on the question of Capital, you will record your votes in favor of its retention at New Westminster:-

SURNAMEGIVEN NAMES
AlexanderW. L.
AlmadaJesus
AlwayJohn
BaileyB.
BarlowA.
BarryJ. F.
BlackJames
BoothroydG. W.
BoothroydW. H.
BrouseJ. E.
BurgessJ. P.
BurrJoseph
ChartersW.
ClairPierre
CoffeeEdward
ConnellE.
DelatreE.
DerrierJ.
DouglasB.
EvansChas.
FletcherH. J.
FrauenthalJ.
FrauenthalS.
FullerWm.
GladwinW. B.
GreenbaumL.
JonesJohn
KellyR.
KimballD. W.
Kwong Lee & Co.
LaneWm.
LangmuirA.
Latermoniliere
MacielJohn
MackayP.
MallayWm.
McBryenA.
McDonaldW.
McEnteePatrick
McLardyAdam
McLardyT.
McQuarrieDan
MullenB. T.
OppenheimL. S.
PleaceJohn
ReeceJ.
RinoPatrick
RinoT.
RombratC. E.
RombronV.
RossC. L.
RushM.
SampsonB. B.
VaughanS.
VoightWm.
WargandL.

 

 

This list was originally published in The British Columbia Genealogist, Volume 22 #1 March 1993, page 17.

Enumerators’ Problems – 1930 Vancouver BC Canada – Dogs, Unwilling and Know-It-All People

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Genealogists and family historians sometimes voice their frustrations with the work of enumerators on the historical census and voters’ lists. Why didn’t they…? How could they…? Didn’t they ask? Who on earth did they get that answer from?

Here’s an article from the Vancouver Sun newspaper, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, Wednesday, 4 June 1930 (page 11), that may explain some of those missed, seemingly misspelt or cryptic entries.  Continue reading